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Sending E-Mail Through Command Line With Python


From "Automate The Boring Stuff With Python", here, and the matching course on Wireshark.


Going through the course, I saw 'Email' as an option, and was immediately excited to see how we can send automated emails with Python sans using a fancy SaaS with sparkling GUI.

 I'm not going to copy the article listed above verbatim, but talk about things that are new to me.



 One of the commands is type([]), which shows us the kind ('type') of argument.

 You can put in three things and it makes a new type object; type(brachius, 53, phelonious)

 Since this is port 587, we need TLS (Transport Layer Security, symmetric key!) encryption;


 I wonder what the b'2.0.0 means.

Otherwise, the server is ready. In an era where 2-Factor Authentication is all the rage (For good reason), how will logging into an email account via the command line work with that?

I'm getting a 'Bad Credentials' Error message - is it just me?

Maybe, maybe not.

 Oh, and we also get an answer to that 2-Factor Authentication Question; We'd have to allow the accounts to allow access from less secure apps (Unless said account is set up with 2FA)...I also got a lot of security alerts from Google. Thanks for the concern, folks! It's me.

After quite a lot of finagling that proved I do not know my passwords as well as I believe I do, I get into an account.

Email, password.


Now; to send myself a message;

Three arguments; Sender, receiver, message.

It did work, although it was sent to my Spam folder, and I got the formatting wrong. Good thing it's a short message.

I will!

& always remember to disconnect from the server. And that's how it's done - with SMTP at least.

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