Skip to main content

Book: Click Here to Kill Everybody by Bruce Schenier


"There is a fundamental difference between crashing your computer and losing your spreadsheet data, and crashing your pacemaker and losing your life," 

Blog Post

If you follow me across the web, you know I deeply distrust the Internet of Things. In making things easier for the non-techie, having simple or non existent security options makes them - and everyone else - more at risk for cybercrime.

I finished my Security+ book and read Click Here to Kill Everybody.





Schenier doesn't only break down how the IoT is the wild west of consumer products - There's a lot of regulations that fail to become law because, well, why bother changing it? Our data is continually at risk and companies do not care about it - and neither do we.

Target had a data breach - Do you still shop there? Will your next vacation be at Marriott after 500 million users had their data compromised? Probably. Did their systems fail predictably, safely? My bet is no.

You may say "The government implementing laws can't solve all the problems" and you would not be wrong.

Interconnected networks were built on shoddy protocols - Protocols that have updates and upgrades that are not widely implemented because it would cost too much to retool protocols that we have used for 30 years, and companies do not want to pay for that.

"We also tell them to not insert strange USB drives into their computers. Again, what else would you possibly do with a USB drive? We have to do better: we need systems that remain secure regardless of which links people click on, and regardless of which USB drives they stick into their computers."

Schenier pushes education on all levels, technologists and policy makers working closely together on what's feasible and what isn't, and encouraging people who want to enter the Cybersecurity field. With breaches everywhere you turn and a growing presence of the internet in our refrigerators, it should not be as hard as it is to break into the IT field.


It's a great, informative read with lots of footnotes and links to articles and resources that I will probably end up reading and writing about here, so please pay for the book and give it a read.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

What Do You Need? [AKA; List of Offered Services / My Next Role] (2020)

I am a trusted outsourced remote consultant for your company.   I enjoy having the flexibility to take on temporary projects from time to time! I start at part-time, temp work for now. If we like each other, we can renegotiate. If anything sounds weird, out there, or unusual - Feel free to e-mail me .  3 Services Offered Writing :      You want to pay me to write more of *waves hand* this blog? I am game .     I write B2C e-mails going out to over 280 people weekly. [ Example Job Description ]        Auditing :        Something doesn't work on your page. I can find it, or you can lose business. [ Here ] [ Example Job Description ]   Technical: Still as-needed, always remote, contract, or temporary. IT Operations Tech [ Example Job Description ]     Hardware and SaaS support.     Cisco routing and switching (Networking). CCNA, A+, Sec+, Azure certified WORKING ON: Junos Networking Cloud Technician     Azure [ See tag ]  Support [Web: Example Job Description ] [Text : Example

Portfolio of UX/Product Feedback [Vol. 1]

Have You Looked at Your Webpage From the Customer's View Lately? You have probably been linked here from a form or my resume. If you have any questions about what I'm looking for in a role, click here .   This post is not to shame, but to point out errors and hopefully make my talent for finding and documenting such mistakes clear to someone hiring. Contents: Instances where I offer constructive feedback on someone's website, logo, or app. Actions that were taken by the developers or artists.  I'm glad you want your webpages to be the best they can be with my help; If you need your sites audited, e-mail me . Latest Update -  November 20th, 2020.   Vol. 2 is here .

Wireless Diagnostics on Mac OS; Packet Sniffing on a WLAN

There's a post sitting in my drafts about Wireshark and how to sniff packets out of the air that was going to be about sniffing for authentication packets for Wi-Fi hotspots that aren't broadcasting SSID (Which you shouldn't do apparently! It's still not safe). I was watching this video to find a little more information about how to properly use Monitoring mode on my Macbook to sniff for WLAN packets on the network. So when he said "Just open up Wireless Diagnostics and sniff your network (check your width and channel)." It was shocking to me.