Skip to main content

Routerworld

As I poke around my home office, I find two wireless routers. Technically they should be a combo switch/router, or a L3 Switch, but they're here.

Well, one is the combo device, one is a flat out wireless router that would connect to an ISPs router to give us access to the internet.

So I hooked one up to my PC (My Laptop doesn't have Ethernet ports) so I could poke around again with my old-found (as opposed to new-found) IT knowledge.

Welcome to Routerworld.


We own the equipment even though we don't have AT&T's internet anymore.




It's not like Cisco's command line interface - This is for the consumer market, and that means you have to make things GUI-ish.




Hey, we may not use this anymore but that doesn't mean I want people to see the Key.

We weren't using WEP, but TKIP is only marginally better. There was some kind of odd disconnect if I recall correctly - Every device could use the higher security settings except my 2013 Macbook Air, so the compromise was made.

I should check what Authentication type our current setup is using.

Here is how an individual device would look; In this case, my Wii U.


I'm not sure what outbound port it would use, not 80.

The Wii U (and Switch) are P2P connected for playing Splatoon online.

Since the higher-ports are used for certain manufacturers (or just at random for connectivity), I *think* the Wii U had a port in the 4000s that one could tell their local firewall to leave open to have the game run smoother, but it normally boiled down to your internet speed, especially the upload speed.

Speaking of the Firewall;


Block ping is telling your firewall not to respond if someone pings it.

The alarming thing is, The Telnet box was checked!

 Of course, that's if I initiated the connection, but I hope that even in the year 2016 people weren't allowing Telnet connections.

Oddly, SSH isn't a standalone option.


Bridge mode would be two computers talking to each other on the local network.



If your home network is using 190 devices, wow.

Ethernet enabled - My PC and either my phone (Charging, attached to my PC), or the Wireless adapter (Because I don't have a wireless card in this particular machine).

I have more reason to believe it's probably seeing the wireless adapter because it can see nine active devices on the Wireless side - probably various DirectTV cable boxes, maybe our router in use now.

Here are some logs;


I leave you with some Digital Subscriber Line details. Nothing, because no internet service.

EMPLOYERS: This is me repurposing old technology.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Connecting IoT Devices to a Registration Server (Packet Tracer, Cisco)

In Packet Tracer, a demo software made by Cisco Systems. It certainly has changed a lot since 2016. It's almost an Olympic feat to even get started with it now, but it does look snazzy. This is for the new CCNA, that integrates, among other things, IoT and Automation, which I've worked on here before. Instructions here . I don't know if this is an aspect of "Let's make sure people are paying attention and not simply following blindly", or an oversight - The instructions indicate a Meraki Server, when a regular one is the working option here. I have to enable the IoT service on this server. Also, we assign the server an IPv4 address from a DHCP pool instead of giving it a static one. For something that handles our IoT business, perhaps that's safer; Getting a new IPv4 address every week or so is a minimal step against an intruder, but it is a step. There are no devices associated with this new server; In an earlier lab (not shown), I attached them to 'H

Securing Terraform and You Part 1 -- rego, Tfsec, and Terrascan

9/20: The open source version of Terraform is now  OpenTofu     Sometimes, I write articles even when things don't work. It's about showing a learning process.  Using IaC means consistency, and one thing you don't want to do is have 5 open S3 buckets on AWS that anyone on the internet can reach.  That's where tools such as Terrascan and Tfsec come in, where we can make our own policies and rules to be checked against our code before we init.  As this was contract work, I can't show you the exact code used, but I can tell you that this blog post by Cesar Rodriguez of Cloud Security Musings was quite helpful, as well as this one by Chris Ayers . The issue is using Rego; I found a cool VS Code Extension; Terrascan Rego Editor , as well as several courses on Styra Academy; Policy Authoring and Policy Essentials . The big issue was figuring out how to tell Terrascan to follow a certain policy; I made it, put it in a directory, and ran the program while in that directory

Building, Breaking, and Building A CRM with Retool

 I like no- or low-code solutions to things. I've often wanted to simply push a button or move some GUI around and have the code implement itself.  I've thought about building something that's like a customer relationship management (CRM) system for keeping up with my network better than my little spreadsheet where I click links and then go like something. The general idea in this CRM Development is:  To have a GUI to add people to a NRM (Network Relationship Management).       Attach it to a database (MySQL is what I went with eventually using Amazon Relational Database service, but you can use PostGRES, and probably others).     Make sure components are connected to each other in the retool interface. This video is a good start. Watching the tutorial video, heard some SQL commands and went 'Oh no 😳" before going "Wait I know basic SQL", which is good, because you'll see.  When you get set up, there's a plethora of resources you can use -- Incl